moodiful819

Professional Jellyfish

Posts tagged words

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whisperedgalaxies asked: Re: Swearing in America We don't have the most variation in our swearing, whereas a lot of other languages have swears that capture more levels of intensity that just doesn't translate. The interesting thing about "fuck" though is it is just so flexible (in american dialects). You can use it as nearly every part of speech. As a result, however, we don't use much else. As a reader from America, the use of swears in American Gods sounded very natural to me. -A linguistics major

neil-gaiman:

I agree. The glory of fuck is all the things you can do with it and all the things it can do. It’s an unbefuckinglievably useful swear word (used just there as an expletive infixation). 

Filed under neil gaiman Lit-nerding words

92,127 notes

elevenses-on-trenzalore:

zemedelphos:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:


generalbriefing:


So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…


Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.


Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.
The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:  Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).  Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).  Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).  Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).  Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).  Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).  Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).  Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).  Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).  Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).  Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).  You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.
Link 

To expand on this, Jesus’s name is Anglicized in this way as well. We get Jesus from the Latin form of the Greek “Ἰησοῦς”(Iēsous), which is derived from the Herbrew “ישוע”(Yeshu’a, which meant “YHWH is Salvaion”, YHWH, or Yahweh being the name of God). When another form of that name, ” יְהוֹשֻׁעַ”(Yeoshu’a) was allowed to Anglicize through a different set of corruptions, it entered the English Language through Reformist Protestants as the name “Joshua”.Yes. Jesus’s actual name is Joshua.

joshua christ this is fascinating

elevenses-on-trenzalore:

zemedelphos:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:

generalbriefing:

So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…

Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.

Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.

The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:

Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).

Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).

Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).

Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).

Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).

Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).

Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).

Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).

Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).

Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).

Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).

You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.

Link 

To expand on this, Jesus’s name is Anglicized in this way as well. We get Jesus from the Latin form of the Greek “Ἰησοῦς”(Iēsous), which is derived from the Herbrew “ישוע”(Yeshu’a, which meant “YHWH is Salvaion”, YHWH, or Yahweh being the name of God). When another form of that name, ” יְהוֹשֻׁעַ”(Yeoshu’a) was allowed to Anglicize through a different set of corruptions, it entered the English Language through Reformist Protestants as the name “Joshua”.

Yes. Jesus’s actual name is Joshua.

joshua christ this is fascinating

(Source: stfueverything, via gallowshumorrandom)

Filed under Religion interesting words JESSICA LOOK AT THIS

513 notes

cataglottism
[kat-glow-tiz-uh-m]
(noun) In our list of most sensual words, cataglottism is the first base of romance. This extremely bizarre and rare word defines the act of french kissing. Even pronouncing cataglottism exercises the tongue more than most words.  (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

Filed under words

925 notes

lalochezia
[la-low-kee-zee-ah]
(noun) In our list of interesting words, lalochezia is the state of emotional relief one achieves from using vulgar language. This satisfying feeling accompanied with the act of telling someone to f—k off is a great stress relief. If somebody accuses you of having a potty mouth, counteract their unimaginative insult by explaining that copious amounts of lalochezia is helping you from punching them in the face. A little humor and intelligence always goes a long way.  (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

Filed under words JESSICA LOOK AT THIS how I live my life

168,785 notes

polyteleology:

sunteaflower:

We call ships ‘she.’ We call our war machines ‘women.’ We compare women to black widows and vipers. And you’re going to tell me it’s not ‘lady-like’ to scream, to take up space, to fight and demand respect and do whatever the hell I want. You’ve looked at nuclear bombs and been so in awe that you could only name them after women. Don’t try to down-play my power.

I want to frame this and put it next to my computer.

(via gallowshumorrandom)

Filed under words gender and society mind is blown cannot. CANNOT JESSICA LOOK AT THIS

874 notes

induratize
[in-door-a-tahyz]
(verb) In our list of beautiful feelings, this heartbreaking act is the manifestation of hardening one’s heart. This is a side-effect from pain; it is a way of emotional self-preservation. Just because one has induratized, it does not mean you have chosen to become numb from love or emotions, it is a form of self-protection. We prefer that everybody guards their heart but with a soft coating, rather than a hard one.  (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

Filed under words

264 notes

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Franz Kafka 
Franz Kafka was born on July 3, 1883 in Prague, Czech Republic. Kafka’s incomplete body of work was published posthumously by his dear Friend, Max Brod. He is one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. 
From an early age, tragedy influenced the Kafka home. Born into a well-to-do Jewish family, at the age of 6, both Kafka’s younger brothers, Georg and Heinrich died in infancy. This was a chain reaction propelling the complicated history between Kafka and his parents. His mother never understood his ambitions to be a writer, while his father had a vicious temper and rejected his son’s creativity. His father saw no honor in writing, but rather in a practical career.
For much of his life Kafka believed his struggles in love and relationships were hindered and stemmed from the complicated relationship with his father. His work often mirrors this dynamic, the protagonists of his literature must overcome an overbearing situation with the possibility that it will puncture their self-worth. 
Plagued with self-doubt, prior to his death, Kafka requested that Max Brod never publishes his work. In a letter he wrote:

"Dearest Max, my last request: Everything I leave behind me … in the way of diaries, manuscripts, letters (my own and others’), sketches, and so on, [is] to be burned unread."

Brod dismissed Kafka’s wishes and published every piece of literature he possessed from his friend after his death.  Although his work is unfinished, his literature is so deeply influential that the English lexicon has adopted a word for his style of writing: Kafkaesque. Frederick R. Karl author of a critical biography of Franz Kafka described Kafkaesuqe to the NYT as entering a surreal world

"in which all your control patterns, all your plans, the whole way in which you have configured your own behavior, begins to fall to pieces, when you find yourself against a force that does not lend itself to the way you perceive the world.You don’t give up, you don’t lie down and die. What you do is struggle against this with all of your equipment, with whatever you have. But of course you don’t stand a chance. That’s Kafkaesque."

On June 3, 1924, Franz Kafka died Kierling, Austria, where he was buried along side his parents in Prague’s New Jewish Cemetery in Olsanske.
NOTABLE WORKS:
Metamorphosis (1915)
The Trial
The Castle
Amerika
The Diaries
Read excerpts by Franz Kafka here! Get his books here!

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Franz Kafka 

Franz Kafka was born on July 3, 1883 in Prague, Czech Republic. Kafka’s incomplete body of work was published posthumously by his dear Friend, Max Brod. He is one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. 

From an early age, tragedy influenced the Kafka home. Born into a well-to-do Jewish family, at the age of 6, both Kafka’s younger brothers, Georg and Heinrich died in infancy. This was a chain reaction propelling the complicated history between Kafka and his parents. His mother never understood his ambitions to be a writer, while his father had a vicious temper and rejected his son’s creativity. His father saw no honor in writing, but rather in a practical career.

For much of his life Kafka believed his struggles in love and relationships were hindered and stemmed from the complicated relationship with his father. His work often mirrors this dynamic, the protagonists of his literature must overcome an overbearing situation with the possibility that it will puncture their self-worth. 

Plagued with self-doubt, prior to his death, Kafka requested that Max Brod never publishes his work. In a letter he wrote:

"Dearest Max, my last request: Everything I leave behind me … in the way of diaries, manuscripts, letters (my own and others’), sketches, and so on, [is] to be burned unread."

Brod dismissed Kafka’s wishes and published every piece of literature he possessed from his friend after his death.  Although his work is unfinished, his literature is so deeply influential that the English lexicon has adopted a word for his style of writing: Kafkaesque. Frederick R. Karl author of a critical biography of Franz Kafka described Kafkaesuqe to the NYT as entering a surreal world

"in which all your control patterns, all your plans, the whole way in which you have configured your own behavior, begins to fall to pieces, when you find yourself against a force that does not lend itself to the way you perceive the world.You don’t give up, you don’t lie down and die. What you do is struggle against this with all of your equipment, with whatever you have. But of course you don’t stand a chance. That’s Kafkaesque."

On June 3, 1924, Franz Kafka died Kierling, Austria, where he was buried along side his parents in Prague’s New Jewish Cemetery in Olsanske.

NOTABLE WORKS:

Metamorphosis (1915)

The Trial

The Castle

Amerika

The Diaries

Read excerpts by Franz Kafka here! Get his books here!

Filed under Lit-nerding words history books