moodiful819

Professional Jellyfish

Posts tagged resource

7,339 notes

angrynerdyblogger:

sixpenceee:

ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS PICTURES TAKEN
The above picture you see is off the elephant’s foot, a radioactive mass. It’s from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. 
These are the effects:
After just 30 seconds of exposure, dizziness and fatigue will find you a week later. Two minutes of exposure and your cells will begin to hemorrhage (ruptured blood vessels); four minutes: vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. 300 seconds and you have two days to live. 
ANOTHER DEADLY PLACE
SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

The coolest thing about this photo is definitely the radiation damage. Look at the bright squiggles, and the way the man seems to be in two places at once. This is because even as the photo is being taken, the radiation is causing severe damage to the camera.
According to another source, the man in the photograph and the cameraman are now dead. Apparently, the radiation would have been too high for them to live more than a few years after this, even if they had just run in, snapped the photo, and ran out again. If they spent more than a few seconds here, it’s possible they could have died even quicker.

angrynerdyblogger:

sixpenceee:

ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS PICTURES TAKEN

The above picture you see is off the elephant’s foot, a radioactive mass. It’s from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. 

These are the effects:

After just 30 seconds of exposure, dizziness and fatigue will find you a week later. Two minutes of exposure and your cells will begin to hemorrhage (ruptured blood vessels); four minutes: vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. 300 seconds and you have two days to live. 

ANOTHER DEADLY PLACE

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

The coolest thing about this photo is definitely the radiation damage. Look at the bright squiggles, and the way the man seems to be in two places at once. This is because even as the photo is being taken, the radiation is causing severe damage to the camera.

According to another source, the man in the photograph and the cameraman are now dead. Apparently, the radiation would have been too high for them to live more than a few years after this, even if they had just run in, snapped the photo, and ran out again. If they spent more than a few seconds here, it’s possible they could have died even quicker.

(via sunblaze24)

Filed under history science! resource

49 notes

10 Fascinating Facts About Ravens

(Source: faeven, via sketchlock)

Filed under birds raven resource

38,547 notes

useful links about the 50s/60s/70s for fanfiction/imagine writers!!

sodaspop:

slang:

  • 50s 
  • 60s
  • 70s (includes lots of phrases used by hippies)

fashion:

music:

movies:

culture:

inventions:

extras:

it’s good to be well-informed when writing fanfictions and such and i hope this helps u guys out!!!

(via superboys)

Filed under resource history cool things for you

1,117 notes

art-of-swords:

Cutting bodies: Illustrations from period Japanese manuals on tameshigiri and suemonogiri

  • by Randy McCall 

The origins of modern test cutting descend from a much more violent era.  Modern tameshigiri is defined as the testing of the skill of the practitioner by cutting objects, usually rolled straw mats or bundled straw.

In the late Edo Period (1603 t0 1868) and early Meiji Period (1868 to 1912) — where a smith or the owner of a blade might wish to prove the its quality and cutting power — tameshigiri was defined as testing the sword against the object being cut. Under this definition, helmets (kabuto), armour (yoroi), and heavy sections of bamboo or wood might be cut.   This testing process, if incorrectly carried out by unskilled practitioners, or where the quality of the blade was not the best, could easily result in the destruction of the sword.

This same time periods also saw  the practice of the extreme form of tameshigiri known as aratameshi — testing a sword to destruction to see how much abuse it could take.  As I mention in the articled linked to, many believe this practice was an attempt by the Japanese to prove the superiority of their weapons over European blades.

In even earlier times (Edo period and before) another version of tameshigiri was performed on the bodies of executed criminals.  This practice is more properly defined as suemonogiri, “the cutting of tied objects”.

The reason for this is quite simple; the bodies of criminals would be tied into various positions to allow the test cutter to make the appropriate cuts.

In this grisly test, positioning was important, as the blades would often bisect the criminal’s body along lines designed to cut through the maximum amount of bone possible.  It required extreme skill on the part of the tester, who must cut precisely or potentially break the blade.

That such a manual existed for the training of test cutters shows the importance this position held.  At certain points of Japanese history professional test cutters known as “otameshi-geisha” were in great demand.

[ CONTINUE READING… ] 

Source: Copyright © 2014 Tameshigiri - The Art of Cutting

Filed under swordplay swords Japan history resource